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subscribers 2012/01/30 14:24 subscribers 2016/11/24 16:39 current
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-**Not a Subscriber?** Sorry. The Connolly Report print edition is closed to new subscribers. It's possible to order certain material from inside this site, my daily writings, for instance, in 2012.  +The Connolly Report PRINT edition is closed to new subscribers.
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-Please visit again in a few months. +
Charles Ellis, author of //Winning the Loser's Game// puts it this way: “high stock prices - as much as you love them - are not good for you. Eventually, you will have to give back every single increment of return you get that's above the long-term central trend.” 26 Charles Ellis, author of //Winning the Loser's Game// puts it this way: “high stock prices - as much as you love them - are not good for you. Eventually, you will have to give back every single increment of return you get that's above the long-term central trend.” 26
Hope the great giving back period began in 1998. That's roughly when the yield of the stock I follow reached their nadir. If so, and we are 14 years into the bear, it will all be over sooner. Hope the great giving back period began in 1998. That's roughly when the yield of the stock I follow reached their nadir. If so, and we are 14 years into the bear, it will all be over sooner.
-There are places to obtain good current information of dividend stocks...John Heinzl's and Rob Carrick's columns in the Report on Business, for instance. And Don MacDonald in the Gazette. Your biggest problem, however, will be you. Most people don't have the patience, self control or the tenacity to stay the course. If you still smoke and/or don't pay off your credit card balance on time or can't resist eating a lot of processed food, forget it. You'll just have to buy a mutual fund or a guaranteed product (such as Manulife's 'Income Plus') and be fleeced by the fees. I wish you luck. 
Here's what I mean about behaviour control, courtesy of John Bogle speaking to the New York Society of Security Analysts. When the stock market was "fairly valued" as the 1990s began, "the average market participant had...70% [of assets] in fixed-income investments and 30% in equities. But in the highly valued market as 2001 began, the ratio averaged 19% in fixed-income and 81% in equities." Here's what I mean about behaviour control, courtesy of John Bogle speaking to the New York Society of Security Analysts. When the stock market was "fairly valued" as the 1990s began, "the average market participant had...70% [of assets] in fixed-income investments and 30% in equities. But in the highly valued market as 2001 began, the ratio averaged 19% in fixed-income and 81% in equities."
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