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  * **Retirement Planning** - "If you are planning to retire in 10 to 15 years, we think you should consider buying stocks that have long histories of dividend increases. While investors tend to look at the current yield (the indicated dividend divided by the share price) of a stock, we believe yield of cost)the indicated dividend dividend by the share purchase price) may be a more accurate measure of the long term value of a dividend." [S&P's Outlook]. Standard and Poors listed 22 stocks in order of their yield on cost. The average, after a decade was 15%. Are you getting 15% on your retirement investments? Connolly Report Oct 2004   * **Retirement Planning** - "If you are planning to retire in 10 to 15 years, we think you should consider buying stocks that have long histories of dividend increases. While investors tend to look at the current yield (the indicated dividend divided by the share price) of a stock, we believe yield of cost)the indicated dividend dividend by the share purchase price) may be a more accurate measure of the long term value of a dividend." [S&P's Outlook]. Standard and Poors listed 22 stocks in order of their yield on cost. The average, after a decade was 15%. Are you getting 15% on your retirement investments? Connolly Report Oct 2004
-  * **Retirement Investing** If anyone would, you'd think Jonathan Clements, a reporter with the Wall Street Journal since 1990, would get it right. But he didn't. Mr Clements omitted the concept of dividend growth in a column on retirement investing. In the opening statement of his February 1, 2004 column in the Sunday New York Times (link: February 2004 Connolly Report), Clements argued "that the stock bond mix you hold in retirement shouldn't be radically different from the mix you held just before quitting the work force". He is right of course, and clements had some compelling arguments and other good ideas in the column. but he missed what could have been his best point. Clements said "if you are determined to spend only income, there isn't much incentive to hold stocks, with their miserable 1½% average dividend yield. Instead we are almost inevitable driven to buy bonds and other investments that generate a fair amount of income." TC: If a person owned common stocks before retirement, as Clements maintained in his opening sentence, surely some of those stocks, with dividend growth, would be yielding more than the index yield going into retirement. After a decade, the average yield on original cost of 22 S&P index stocks was 15%. With dividend growth a company's yield grows over time and enhances retirement income. In fact, the need for any bonds is often eliminated. In his 2018 Letter to Shareholders, Warren Buffett put it this way: " . . . eventually stocks become safer than bonds ... +  * May 19, 2020 → **Retirement Investing** If anyone would, you'd think Jonathan Clements, a reporter with the Wall Street Journal since 1990, would get it right. But he didn't. Mr Clements omitted the concept of dividend growth in a column on retirement investing. In the opening statement of his February 1, 2004 column in the Sunday New York Times (link: February 2004 Connolly Report), Clements argued "that the stock bond mix you hold in retirement shouldn't be radically different from the mix you held just before quitting the work force". He is right of course, and Clements had some compelling arguments and other good ideas in the column. But he missed what could have been his best point. Clements said "if you are determined to spend only income, there isn't much incentive to hold stocks, with their miserable 1½% average dividend yield. Instead we are almost inevitable driven to buy bonds and other investments that generate a fair amount of income." TC: If a person owned common stocks before retirement, as Clements maintained in his opening sentence, surely some of those stocks, with dividend growth, would be yielding more than the index yield of 1½% going into retirement. If the dividend goes up, Mr Clement, the yield rises too. Look into dividend growth. After a decade, the average yield on original cost of Connolly Report stocks was 8.1%* (eight point one beats the market with out counting capital gains). Now, here's the bonus...the double double (Tim Horton and I both went to St. Mike's). CAGR on dividends was 8.2%* and, because dividend growth drives price growth, Jonathan, price CAGR was 8.6%* from 2009 to 2019. With dividend growth a company's yield grows over time and enhances retirement income. In fact, the need for any bonds is often eliminated. In his 2018 Letter to Shareholders, Warren Buffett put it this way: " . . . eventually stocks become safer than bonds ... *The Connolly Report dividend growth summary, year-by-year and decade long CAGR on dividends and CAGR price is prepared every Fall. It's part of your $50 access fee. This year's report might be the last CAGR as next year I'm 40 years with the report and I'm eighty. Time to quit!
  * After a decade or so, quality dividend growth stocks provide __yields__ which outpace the TSX and that's without factoring in appreciation in the stock price. Learn about this inside. The entry fee is $50.  Alternatively, read //Building Wealth with Dividend Stocks// by Joseph Tigue or ♣ Your Growing Income by Henry Mah. You'll be tens of thousands of dollars ahead. We are hundreds of thousands ahead having started at the turn of the century. If you are not disciplined and patient, forget it and index with an over-diversified ETF full of mediocre issues. Quality does it, holding does it. Facts about dividend, as the dividend goes so does the price, say, do not cease to exist because one ignores them.   * After a decade or so, quality dividend growth stocks provide __yields__ which outpace the TSX and that's without factoring in appreciation in the stock price. Learn about this inside. The entry fee is $50.  Alternatively, read //Building Wealth with Dividend Stocks// by Joseph Tigue or ♣ Your Growing Income by Henry Mah. You'll be tens of thousands of dollars ahead. We are hundreds of thousands ahead having started at the turn of the century. If you are not disciplined and patient, forget it and index with an over-diversified ETF full of mediocre issues. Quality does it, holding does it. Facts about dividend, as the dividend goes so does the price, say, do not cease to exist because one ignores them.
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